Tag: daily oil painting

CLOUD STUDY / Daily Painting #1020

Oil on Paper Mounted on Panel / 6 x 6 Inches

We're having some beautiful clouds this time of year. Lots of drama in the skies. The promise of rain and, occasionally, a very nice downpour.

If you would like to own today's painting, just send your bid in an email to: farnsworthgallery@newmex.com, or call Thea at 505 982-4561

Click Here to see my Daily Photographs

NOTE! I have a special new WORKSHOP coming up in July. Click HERE for details. I hope you can join us. Materials included.

Please remember that if you would like to commission a larger version of your favorite subject, if you would like to check on the availability of a given image, or if you would like to schedule a workshop, we are just a phone call away, at 505 982-4561, or you can email us at: john@johnfarnsworth.com.

SONRISA / Daily Painting #974

Oil on Paper Mounted on Panel / 6 x 6 Inches

It's been quite a while since I painted a Mexican mask representing a human as opposed to an animal mask. In the process of sorting, filing, renaming and as much as possible, organizing my research images, I came across this smiling fellow from Morelia in the State of Michoacan, with a curly moustache, and realized it was time to revisit the subject. So I did.

Sonrisa, by the way, means smile in the Spanish language, in case you didn't already know.

Click Here to see my Daily Photographs.

NOTE! I have a special new WORKSHOP coming up in July. Click HERE for details. I hope you can join us. Materials included.

Please remember that if you would like to commission a larger version of your favorite subject, if you would like to check on the availability of a given image, or if you would like to schedule a workshop, we are just a phone call away, at 505 982-4561, or you can email us at: john@johnfarnsworth.com.

 

BUFFALO KACHINA / Daily Painting #957

Oil on Paper Mounted on Panel / 6 x 6 Inches

This very old baby Buffalo Kachina is from the collection at the Museum of Man in Balboa Park, San Diego, California. This is the third time I've painted him, from different angles. He's always a challenge, and always a pleasure to paint. While old Buffalo Kachinas are quite rare, there a lot of modern versions, but none of them have the presence or personality these older ones have.

NOTE! I have a special new WORKSHOP coming up in July. Click HERE for details. I hope you can join us.

Click Here to see my Daily Photographs.

Please remember that if you would like to commission a larger version of your favorite subject, if you would like to check on the availability of a given image, or if you would like to schedule a workshop, we are just a phone call away, at 505 982-4561, or you can email us at: john@johnfarnsworth.com

 

THE LISTENER Daily Painting #667

The Listener

THE LISTENER

Oil on Panel / 6 x 6 inches / ©John Farnsworth

If you would like to own this painting, just email your bid to: bid@johnfarnsworth.com

MINI ADVENTURE

Tonight’s post will be another short one. I have to get up at seven, and I’m used to going to bed at three and four in the morning. The reason I have to get up so early is that I’ve been invited to accompany a friend on a mini adventure. I’ll tell you all about it tomorrow, or the next day if it goes that long. Stay tuned. In the meantime, if you haven’t already, be sure to scroll all the way down to read about your chance to participate in the creation of a documentary Be Home Soon.

NAVAJO PONIES, CANYON DE CHELLY Daily Photograph #1,638

Navajo Ponies, Canyon de Chelly

NAVAJO PONIES, CANYON DE CHELLY

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

How would you like to be Associate Producer on an important film while sharing in the realization of a dream? You can, and at the same time give a leg up to a good and deserving woman, our special friend, Melissa Howden. To find out how, just click on this link:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/489495655/be-home-soon-letters-from-my-grandfather?ref=live

Congratulations Melissa! She’s passed the half way mark, both in time and in the amount already pledged.  Check it out.

Are you enjoying these daily paintings, photos and writings? If you are, please help us out by clicking on the Google+, Facebook, and Twitter Icons below. And share us with your friends. Thanks!

TAOS CLOUD Daily Painting #651

Taos Cloud

TAOS CLOUD

Oil on Panel / 6 x 6 inches / ©John Farnsworth

If you would like to own this painting, please visit the Terms and Conditions.

INDEPENDENCE DAY AND THE MONSOONS

The monsoons are here, right on schedule. With all the fireworks sales, we need all the rain we can get. Of course, we always do, even without the fireworks. With the change in weather come the towering cumulus clouds, lightning and thunder; and the rain. The blessed rain. With any luck at all, we should soon be able to change our collective mood from hopeful to thankful.

We had a great Independence Day with family and friends in Santa Fe, and got home late, so this post will be a little shorter than some. I hope your 4th of July was equally as rewarding.

LEAVING TAOS Daily Photograph #1622

Leaving Taos

LEAVING TAOS

No, don’t get excited. I’m not Leaving Taos. Not yet, anyway. Although I do need to make a trip out to California to pick up Betsy and bring her home. It”s the view at the top of  the Horseshoe with that lone sentinel of a tree that is always there to bid us adieu, and to welcome us on our return.

THE CHURCH AT SAN JOSÉ DEL VADO Daily Painting #643

ADOBE CHURCH AT SAN JOSE DEL VADO

THE CHURCH AT SAN JOSÉ DEL VADO

Oil on Panel / 6 x 6 inches / ©John Farnsworth

If you would like to own this painting, please visit the Terms and Conditions.

I chanced across this little village on my back to Taos following the branding on Rowe Mesa, at the beginning of my travels in Betsy. It was for a while an important Pecos River Crossing on the Santa Fe Trail. Today it small, quiet town; the home, I believe, of Russel Means, aleader in the American Indian Movement of the 1960s.

Several days ago, Thea noticed sounds coming from the attic. Soon the sounds grew to the point of sounding like a bowling alley upstairs. Except that there are no stairs. Then we began to hear Meowing coming from the attic. We heard that some cats had died of Plague on the other side of Taos, so we decided it was time to get them out of there. Thea called animal control, and a deputy sheriff came out, climbed up on the roof, and braved the 120 degree or worse heat to go in and get the cats out. There were none. They must have left for the day. He sealed off the door that had apparently been left open by the satellite dish installer. All done. We thought. That evening, the sounds resumed. We called him back, and he discovered the problem. Our house was originally a flat roofed adobe. The roof consisted of a foot or two of earth on top of pine planks, lain across vigas, or log beams. Then, sometime in the fifties, a rather primitive pitched tin roof was built above the flat roof, creating a small attic space, running the length of the long, narrow house.

About that time, a false ceiling was added in the bedroom, by attaching compressed fiber tiles to cross pieces nailed to the bottoms of the vigas That created a shallow, second attic beneath the first.  A kitten had somehow become trapped in this space, and abandoned by its mother and siblings. The deputy left food and a trap in the attic, but apparently the kitten couldn’t get to it. The noise continued through the night. We weren’t sure how much longer the kitten could survive in the heat and the dark, and with no food or water.

This morning, when I got out of bed, in the other end of the house, where our bedroom now is, I heard the sounds of an electric reciprocating saw coming from the former bedroom, now guest room where the mewing had been coming from. Thea was up on a step stool with saw, chisel and hammer, determined to create an opening into the false attic. She got it open and we made a makeshift ramp for the cat to come down, but it required a jump of six or eight inches. I could coax him to the edge of the hole, and see him looking down, measuring, then backing off, repeatedly. Thea put out a dish of tuna to tempt him. The meows turned to howling and louder meowing.

I put a piece of the tuna at the edge of the opening, and spaced a few more pieces down the ramp. Nothing. Just loud, continuous crying.

I went outside and got some branches to make a “tree” for him to climb down. Then I took a slender branch, rubbed some tuna on the tip, and began wiggling it around in the opening. Pretty soon, I saw a tiny paw reach out for it. Then another, and then the kitten slipped and came sliding down the ramp. Thea picked him up and I knew it was over. Our family had just grown by a tiny, furry bit. We named him Atticus for obvious reasons.

I read somewhere the other day that all blogs turn into either politics or cat pictures. Well, here goes…

ATTICUS

ATTICUS

THEA WITH ATTICUS

THEA WITH ATTICUS

ATTICUS THE SNUGGLER

ATTICUS LOVES TO SNUGGLE

And so, life goes on. And it is grand!

HORSE KATSINA II Daily Painting #642

HORSE KATSINA II

HORSE KATSINA II
Oil on Panel / 6 x 6 inches / ©John Farnsworth

If you would like to own this painting, please visit the Terms and Conditions.

I felt like painting a Kachina today, and had horses on my mind because of the last two days at the Taos Rodeo. Just couldn’t resist taking another shot at this delightful little guy. I almost got him in a trade, but somehow lost contact with the owner/dealer. He traveled, I traveled, we just couldn’t quite get together. Maybe I’ll give him a call and see if he’s back in Santa Fe, and still has it. That’s if I can find his card. Moving has sure made a mess of things. The next time I paint this Kachina, I think I’ll do a profile version.

True Stories

TRUE STORIES

Here’s a shot from yesterday at the rodeo. I played around a while in ACDSee Pro, trying to give it the look of a black and white photograph that’s been hand painted with Marshall’s Oil Paints. My Aunt Inez, whose work inspired me to become an artist, besides being a fine painter in oils and watercolors, also did colored photos by hand. You might want to click on it for a better look.

It’s funny. You go to some insignificant museum with little to offer, and photography is strictly forbidden! Meanwhile, at, say the Louvre, or the Musée de Orsay in Paris, the Prado in Madrid, or the Metropolitan in New York,  you can photograph to your heart’s content. Just don’t use flash.

Rodeos are different. the bigger ones, even Santa Fe don’t allow photography. At least not behind the scenes. Maybe, if you’re properly credentialed. I don’t know about the bleachers or the grandstand. In the smaller rodeos, though, you can do just about anything as long as you don’t get in the way. In Mexico, I’ve been given free rein (pun not intended, but gleefully accepted) everywhere from the Lienzo Charro in Mexico City to the National Championships of Charreada in Zacatecas and Juarez as well as in Puebla, San Miguel de Allende, and the smaller towns. There, I’ve even had wranglers ask how they could be of assistance!

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