RANCHOS CHURCH

RANCHOS CHURCH / iPhone 4s / PhotoForge 2

I just couldn't resist sharing one more image of this iconic adobe church. I hope you like it. If you've been following the last couple of posts on this blog, you already know about it, if not, just scroll down and read about it there.

Hasta mañana.

 

TAOS CHURCH, AGAIN

iPhone4s / PhotoForge 2 / Photogene

Here's another shot of the church featured in yesterday's blog. This one is also from my former daily photo blog, When a Painter Snaps.

Here's what I wrote at the time:

Five days ago, I posted an image of Thea and our friend, Jay Olson, in front of the Church at Ranchos. Admittedly, it was more snapshot than photograph. This is called When a Painter Snaps, after all.

Today, though, I decided to post my latest photograph of this beautiful building that has drawn both artists and photographers ranging from Georgia O'Keeffe to Anselm Adams. As for photographers, it's been shot with 8×10 and 4×5 cameras, 35mm cameras, and everything from pinhole cameras and Kodak Brownies to, as in this case, an iPhone.

Hasta mañana.

 

RANCHOS CHURCH

RANCHOS CHURCH IPhone 4s / PhotoForge2

This is the back of the San Francisco de Asis Mission Church, in Ranchos de Taos, New Mexico, made famous by photographers and artists including Ansel Adams, Ernest Leonard Blumenschein and Georgia O’Keeffe. Made of just mud and straw, it was almost lost when misguided attepmts to modernize it by covering it in a concrete plaster resulted in water finding its way through tiny cracks and dissolving the adobe. The plaster hid the results until it was almost too late. When the damage was discovered, the plaster was removed, and the community went back to its earlier practice of mudding (re-plastering with adobe, a mix of mud and straw) the walls every one to three years. It’s fascinating to watch workers lifted high in mechanical cherry pickers applying a coating of mud and straw and polishing it with a piece of sheepskin.

I am proud and pleased to know that my grandsons, Kyle and Westley, have had an opportunity to help in applying the adobe plaster to this iconic bit of Southwestern architecture.

This is a replay from a couple of years ago on my daily photo blog, When a Painter Snaps. That blog is no longer active, but you are welcome to go there to look through some three years of archives.

 

WHITE DOVE OF THE DESERT Daily Painting #729

White Dove of the Desert

WHITE DOVE OF THE DESERT

Oil on Paper mounted on Panel / 6 x 6 Inches

If you would like to own this painting, just email your bid to: bid@johnfarnsworth.com

SAN XAVIER

A summer monsoon passes between Mission San Xavier del Bac, the White Dove of the Desert, on the Tohono O’odham San Xavier Indian Reservation and Tucson, Arizona.

Click Here to see my Daily Photograph

Please remember that if you would like to commission a larger version of your favorite subject, if you would like to check on the availability of a given image, or if you would like to schedule a workshop, we are just a phone call away, at 505 982-4561, or you can email us at: john@johnfarnsworth.com

Are you enjoying these daily paintings, photos and writings? If you are, please help us out by clicking on the Google+, Facebook, Twitter and other Icons below. Share us with your friends. And, by all means, leave a comment. Thanks!

DESERT MISSION Daily Painting #507

DESERT MISSION / Oil on Panel / 6 x 6 Inches / ©John Farnsworth
DESERT MISSION / Oil on Panel / 6 x 6 Inches / ©John Farnsworth

Bidding has ended. If you missed bidding on this or any of our other daily paintings, be sure to visit our Collectors’ Exchange page. Your favorite could still be available.

If you enjoy these daily paintings, please give us a hand. Spread the word. Tell someone you know, friends, family, and colleagues, about A Farnsworth A Day. They will appreciate your personal recommendation, and we will, too.

 

CAMPANARIO Daily Painting #448

Campanario / Oil on Panel / 6 x 6 Inches / ©John Farnsworth

Campanario / Oil on Panel / 6 x 6 Inches / ©John Farnsworth

Built in 1610, by Tlaxcalan Indians from Mexico, the San Miguel Mission in Santa Fe, New Mexico, is widely recognized as the Oldest Church in the United States. The Campanario, or Torre de la Campana (Bell Tower) is seen from the Old Santa Fe Trail in the Barrio de Analco, just across from the Oldest House, also an adobe structure.

Bidding has ended. If you missed bidding on this or any of our other daily paintings, be sure to visit our Collectors’ Exchange page. Your favorite could still be available.

If you enjoy these daily paintings, please give us a hand. Spread the word. Tell someone you know, friends, family, and colleagues, about A Farnsworth A Day. They will appreciate your personal recommendation, and we will, too.

CHURCH AT LAMY Daily Painting #252

Come on over to the Collectors’ Exchange and share in the fun. See you there.

Church at Lamy / Oil on Panel / 6 x 6 Inches / ©John FarnsworthChurch at Lamy / Oil on Panel / 6 x 6 Inches

This is the Mission Chapel of Our Lady of Light, an abandoned mission revival church in Lamy, New Mexico. The Amtrak train station for Santa Fe is located across from this church, which can be seen from the passing Southwest Chief between Los Angeles and Chicago. This painting is part of my Amtrak series.

Bidding has ended. If you missed this or any of our other daily paintings, be sure to visit our Collectors’ Exchange page.

If you enjoy these daily paintings, please give us a hand. Spread the word. Tell someone you know, friends, family, and colleagues, about A Farnsworth A Day. They will appreciate your personal recommendation, and we will, too.